Browsed by
Category: Farming

What You Have Always Wondered About Gardening

What You Have Always Wondered About Gardening

Many people are discovering just how great an organic garden can be. The aim of this article is to help the would-be organic gardener get out there and start planting. Just use these tips to work for you and nutritious results.

Clay is naturally hard, making it difficult to work with. To make your digging project easier, rub the shovel with floor or car wax and then buff it with a cloth. The clay easily slides off of its surface and it will prevent rust.

Select plants that will bring a higher profits and yield.

Use both biennials and annuals to beautify your flower beds. You can fill gaps between shrubs and perennials when they are in the sun. Notable varieties include cosmos, sunflowers, petunia, petunia, marigold, and sunflower. Also, have a look at the best cordless leaf blower reviews which can help you keep clean your garden.

Use climbing vines or plants to cover walls and fences. Many climbers can cover an unattractive wall or fence in as little as one growing season. They also have been known to grow through existing trees or shrubs, and can even be worked to grow around an arbor. Some varieties of these plants will have to be tethered to some sort of support, and others will attach themselves to any surface using their twining stems or tendrils. Some climbers that have proven to be reliable are honeysuckle, jasmine, wisteria, clematis, and wisteria.

When the fall season approaches, you must plant everything you want to eat before winter. A pumpkin can become a planting container instead of clay pots. Once you cut an opening at the top of the pumpkin and scoop out the insides, spray the edges and inside with Wilt-Pruf to prevent rotting.

Most vegetables that can be grown need that much sun to grow the right way at a faster pace. This also rings true for some of flowers.

Fertilizing is an important step in preparing your garden is essential.Manure is an excellent fertilizer, although it is important to use a commercially composted product to minimize the risk of pathogens.

Place a few inches of mulch that is organic in with your vegetable plants. The mulch will help keep the soil around the plants more moist. It will also keeps weeds from sprouting. This will save you a lot of time and effort in pulling out the weeds.

Plant with fall color. Maple, Beech and Dogwood trees are available in a number of fall colors, and dogwood display colors ranging from dark crimson to light yellow. When selecting shrubs that will be colorful during the fall, consider hydrangea, hydrangea, or cotoneaster.

Choose one stand-out plant to be a focal point of your garden. The focal point should be a plant totally different from those that are adjacent.

Wear hats and sunglasses, and apply sunscreen. Protecting yourself from harmful UV rays means you are less likely to get sunburned or suffer skin cancer.

During the hotter parts of the day, your vegetables become too soft, which means even picking them gently can cause them damage.

You need to mulch your garden with about three inches worth of organic material. This will help your garden by adding nourishment to the soil, including enriching the soil, locking in moisture, and improving the overall appearance of the garden.

The best option available to water your organic garden is with a soaker hose.

As long as you can find the proper information and implement it correctly, you should have no trouble growing a great organic garden. Take the information contained above as an example. If you can use these tips to your advantage, you can take the guess work out of an otherwise complicated venture. The above hints will help no matter what you’re going to grow.

Spring has Arrived at Hidden Springs Farm

Spring has Arrived at Hidden Springs Farm

Hi Everyone!

Isn’t it wonderful to finally be seeing some warmer weather and sunshine! Everyone on the farm is enjoying it.  I had planned to send this newsletter yesterday, but since it was April Fool’s Day, I thought you might think I was joking when I start to tell you about everything that has been happening on the farm.  It has been very crazy.

My goat’s, “the girls” began having their babies the beginning of the month.  I had 15 baby goats on the ground in a matter of a few days.  Sounds wonderful right?  Well, my first Doe to deliver was Isabella.  She had a single buckling which is very unusual for her.  So after gloving up and looking to see if there were more, I discovered a second baby that was breech (coming butt first)  It took Ken and I a long time to pull the kid and unfortunately, we lost the baby and Isabella.  I know this happens on a farm, but I get very attached to my girls.  It was hard.  The next girl to deliver was Daisy.  Daisy had triplets, two boys and a girl.  She had them all cleaned up and then she just didn’t seem right.  She is normally an excellent mother.  So I checked, no more babies so I called my vet on Sunday.  Ended up taking Daisy and her three little ones up to the clinic.  Turns out Daisy had pneumonia.  She was very sick.  Dr. Todd, at Logan County Animal Clinic got her fixed up and gave a babies a boost as well.  Since Daisy needed to rest to recover, I get to bottle feed her triplets.

A couple days later, Ken and I went to pick up some hay. We were gone a couple hours. I came back to discover that Baby Girl had twins, Fawn, had a buckling, and Bailee had a bucking.  Bella had twins a day later as did Tye-Dye. Bailee decided it was too much work to be a mother, so now I have another bottle baby.  Tye-Dye decided that she loved her little boy, but her little girl was too much trouble.  So….are you keeping count?  I have 5 bottle babies.  Gwendolyn had twins, and Libby had a little boy…….AND, I’m working about 60 hours a week at my corporate job because of a huge project. So, before Ken was forced to have me placed in a white padded cell, I decided that I had to downsize some.  I’ve sold 4 of my momma goats and their babies.  I was lucky to find several young families that were interested in adding a milk goat to their homesteads.  All of the girls have adjusted very well and I am finding that I am not quite as crazy as I have been this month.  I still have 4 bottle goats and 3 bottle calves and carry 2 gallons of milk to the barn in the morning and the evening to feed them all, but I feel like I’ve gotten a little bit more control now that the herd is smaller.  I would feel even more in control if the off Hidden Springs Farms job would settle down a bit.  I just need to win the lottery.  :>)

We do have a new addition to the farm; but he has a JOB to do.  Meet our new Angus Bull, yet to be named.  We purchased him locally from Robert Elliot & Sons at their Spring auction.  He is very handsome and the ladies seem to like him as well. I like him because he is VERY laid back.  Of course, you never fully trust a bull, they can be moody and dangerous.  But, one of the reason we purchase this bull was because of his docility.  Anyways, here he is laying around.  Notice the young bull trying to act just like him.

In just a few short weeks, the Robertson County Farmer’s Market will be opening.  After a very long winter, we’ll be back with fresh veggies, plants, meats, crafts, and more.  May 2nd is opening day. Mark your calendars so you don’t forget.  We are excited to be participating again this year.

Happy Spring? Not so Sure…from Hidden Springs Farms

Happy Spring? Not so Sure…from Hidden Springs Farms

Greetings Everyone!

I thought by now I’d be saying “Happy Spring” but I do believe that Jack Frost has decided to hang around a bit longer this year.  And, we’re getting ready to get some more rain, freezing rain, ice, and snow tomorrow.  I keep telling my goats to hang on a little longer before they start having their babies.  I plan my breeding so I have babies when the weather isn’t as cold.  This year it isn’t working out very well.  Some of the girls looks like they are ready to explode, but so far, no babies.  They are all ready for the sun to come out and the wet weather to end.

We have had two more calves born on the farm.  Mary add a little bull calve and he is doing great.  Mary is a great momma and taking very good care of him.  Jane had a little heifer calve Saturday morning and has decided she does not have the time or desire to raise a calf.  We ended up putting Jane in the head catch and then I milked her and fed the calf.  Then we but the two of them together to see if she might decide to care for her little one.  No deal, she said! So, now I have this exceptionally beautiful little black Angus heifer in my barn and I’m her momma.  I’ve named her Gabby because she is VERY loud. She wants her bottle when she wants it and wants everyone to know about Hidden Springs Farm!  Bottle calves are work, but I do enjoy them.  Isn’t she a cutie?  Funny, momma would not let the baby nurse, but stood there and let me milk her like she was a dairy cow. Crazy girl!

If you are counting, we have less then two months before the Robertson Farmer’s Market will be opening.  Your challenge is to tell at least two friends about the market.  We’ve been at the fairgrounds for several years now and I’m always surprised to meet people who live in the county that have no idea we are there.  Let’s start spreading the word now! Robertson county residents are very fortunate to have a Farmer’s Market that is made up of ONLY Robertson county farmers.  Trust me when I say, this is a very UNIQUE market.  I hope you plan to come this year.

I have another wonderful Local Business to tell you about.  This month we say Thanks to Corbin Creek Greenhouse on hwy 161 in Springfield.  Now I know that many of you have had the opportunity to meet the Corbins at the farmer’s market and have seen their beautiful flowers and plants.  If you haven’t visited the Greenhouse, plan to this Spring.  I promise you will love everything you see.  And Amy and Miss Jane are awesome.  Great service, Great plants and flowers, and great conversations!  Make plans to visit them this year.

Hidden Spring Farm is a family run operation, in Lebanon County, PA, specializing in 100% grass fed beef and pastured poultry. We also produce sweet corn and pumpkins during the growing season. Our beef herd consists of angus/limousin cattle which are raised on grass/legume pastures here at the farm, from birth to finish. The herd is rotationally grazed, given a new paddock at least once daily and offered free choice kelp and salt. At no time do our cattle receive any grain or growth hormones of any kind. During the winter months they are fed hay and baleage, which we raise on our farm. The chickens we raise are the cornish cross breed. Their diet consists of supplemental grains, plenty of fresh green grass, and any insects they can find. They’re allowed to express their natural pecking and scratching instincts in the open-floor housing units we keep them in. No hormones or growth stimulates are given at any time. The portable housing units are moved once a day to ensure fresh forage and a clean environment for the birds. Beef and chicken must be preordered and picked up at the farm. Chickens can be ordered live or dressed. Beef can be ordered in eighths, quarters, halves, or whole animals. It is processed in a USDA inspected facility and is dry aged for 14 days. This ensures tenderness and enhances flavor. Please call for pricing and availability. Hidden Spring Farm, Eric & Kristen Fetter,

Howdy from Hidden Springs Farms

Howdy from Hidden Springs Farms

Howdy Everyone!

It’s another rainy day here at Hidden Springs Farms…..I’m tired of rain and its not even SPRING! Give me snow any day over rain. Snow looks peaceful and fresh.  Rain, well, rain just means MUD on a farm.  I don’t think any of the animals like it either, well, maybe the ducks.  But I do find them hiding in the barn when it rains hard. We had a beautiful snowy morning a few weeks ago and I really enjoyed it.  Here’s one of my goats, Daisy.  All she is saying is “stop looking at the snow and get busy with the feed bucket!”

Our little calves have become more trouble lately.  They don’t think the fences mean anything.  They just go right through them when they want.  We double checked to make sure that the fences were still HOT (electric), and they are. But these little guys don’t seem to care.  In fact, I was out in the rain chasing two of them back in tonight.  They think its funny to watch the crazy lady out in the pouring rain trying to get them.  Here’s Pearl’s little boy who was caught paying in the pine forest.  He’s momma was none too happy about it either.

We were in Russellville, KY yesterday morning and on our way home, as we made a left hand turn, the person behind us didn’t stop……so, BOOM!  Rear-ended.  Our truck got whacked pretty bad but it is drivable and will be fixed and we are all OK, so other then having to be without the truck while it is fixed, its all good. You can see in the picture below the bumper, but she hit us hard enough to buckle the bed of the truck as well.  The poor girl that hit us was fine physically as well but her car…not so much.  But as the police officer said “that’s why you have insurance”.

I made a really hard decision last month to sell my Tennessee Walking Horse, Rebel.  I’ve had Rebel for 10 years and truly loved him.  But, I rarely have time to ride him and hated that he is such a fabulous horse who doesn’t get the attention he deserves.  So, Rebel went to live with a young lady who needed a well-trained horse that could help her rebuild her confidence and get her back into riding.  I’ll admit, I cried.  I know it is best for him, but Rebel and I had a connection.  Maybe one day I’ll get another horse, but none will ever replace my boy Rebel.

We have a couple of classes/workshops coming up soon that I want you let you know about:

**Scrubs/Balms/Salts:  Feb. 28th 1:30 – 3:30  In this class you’ll learn to make your own Scrubs, Balms, and Salts.  Think of this has learning to create your own “spa” experience at home.  You’ll even take some products home with you!  $45.00

**Cold Process Soap Making: March 7th 1:00-3:30  Learn to make soap the old-fashioned way just like great grandma did.  We’ll talk about equipment, safe handling of lye, and more.  You’ll create two bars of soaps to take home with you.  $45.00

It’s COUNTDOWN time for baby goats!  They should start arriving the towards the end of the month and beginning of March.  Of course, that is all dependent upon whether or not my bucks got right to work when they were with the ladies or if they took their time.  I will definitely keep you posted.  You can follow us on Facebook…..I always post pictures there when the little ones arrive.

Keep an eye out for SPRING….its going to be here before you know it.  Have a fabulous February!

Happy Winter from Hidden Springs Farms

Happy Winter from Hidden Springs Farms

Welcome to Hidden Springs Farms Happy Winter!  Yes, winter finally arrived here at Hidden Springs Farms.  After having 70 degree weather at Christmas time, Mother Nature gave us a wintery wonderland this past weekend.  First came the ice, followed by snow and BOY-OH-BOY did we get snow.  I’d estimate around 8-9 inches and the snow drifts were even higher.  They say its the most snow we’ve gotten since 2003.  While I know it is a pain in the tush for those that have to drive to work, I love to see the snow.  It is so calming and relaxing to me.  Here are a couple pictures from around the farm.  You can see that the ice really was tough on the trees, but it looks beautiful springs farms.

 

Jumper and Winnie LOVED the snow.  It was funny on the first morning when I went over to the barn to let them out of their kennels.  Usually the first thing they do is go running out of the barn to chase the ducks or barn cats.  This time, the took off running until they got to the door and stopped very quickly.  Snow is a new thing to both of them, or at least this much snow.  It didn’t take them long to say “this stuff is COOL!”

The cows and sheep are doing well.  They are so well insulated that the snow stays on their backs like it does on the roof of the house and barns.  And, as long as they have hay and water, they don’t mind being in the weather.  We still have 4 girls that need to calf and quite honestly, I’m glad they have waited until after the snow.  I know it is possible for cows to deliver in terrible weather, but I feel better knowing that the little ones won’t get too chilled.  Besides, I’m really not ready to raise any bottle calves right now.

I have a very fun day the beginning of the month.  I spent the day doing a ride-along with my Vet, Dr. Woodall from Logan Bethel Veterinary Clinic in Russellville, KY.  Dr. Woodall has been my vet for years (and years).  Since I am not working a corporate job right now, I thought it would be both fun and educational to ride with him and see what the day in a life of large animal vet is like.  I met Dr. Woodall at 6:30 am at a large dairy near Adairville, Ky and then visited 7 dairy farms with him.  Basically doing pregnancy checks but also other things such as sick calves, a cow with a dislocated hip, and castrating bull calves.  What a great day for me!

Dancer, my Jersey, will be calving in May.  She is getting to the end of her current lactation, but after she delivers, I’ll be up to eyeballs in Milk.  Just curious if any of my readers would be interested in a Cow Share program this summer and fall.  For those that don’t know, a Cow share program makes it legal for folks that want to drink raw milk to do so legally in the State of Tennessee.  Raw milk (non-pasturized) is illegal to sell in Tennessee but through a Cow Share program, participates buy an interest in a dairy cow.  Then pay a monthly fee to the farmer to care for and milk the cow.  In exchange for this service, you get a gallon of raw milk per week.  We can also make arrangements to get butter and/or cheese.  I have worked out all of the details at this time but let me know if you are interested.  I want to be sure there is interest before moving forward.

Not a lot of other things happening on the farm.  We are fencing a back pasture when the weather cooperates and doing the normal farm chores every morning and night.  Bullford, our bull, will be put in with the ladies this month and I’m sure he’ll be VERY excited.  With that move, we’ll be moving a couple young heifers and a young bull out of the “romance” pasture and putting them in with the two young Jersey steers.

I hope that everyone stays warm.  It won’t be too much longer before Spring is heading your way.

Happy New Year from Hidden Springs Farm

Happy New Year from Hidden Springs Farm

Happy New Year Everyone! I am a couple of days late but like most everything these days, it got here before I was ready.  I hope everyone had a great Christmas and enjoyed celebrating the New Year.  Our oldest son and his family spent some time with us on Christmas Day.  It is so much fun to have the grandchildren around on Christmas.  Let’s face it, Christmas is really for the kids.  Tyler was thrilled with his new books (he LOVES to read) and was especially happy with his new book on how to tie different knots.  He spent quite a bit of time with his Dad and Papa learning how to tie all kinds of fancy knots.  Emery loves her new babies and stuff animals.  We spend lots of time kissing the babies and sitting them in the chairs.  All around, it was a fun day.

I’ve finally gotten brave enough to allow my few laying hens to roam around the farm.  As you probably remember last spring I had a group of stray dogs kill the majority of my hens.  I only have 8 left and they’ve been limited to a small fenced in yard by their coop.  I really prefer them running around the farm and since I was outside working, I decided to let them stretch their legs.  Little Red hen LOVES to wonder.  She’s a pretty little lady and quite

I decided to add a few additions to the farm in December.  Ginger, Cinnamon, and Louie, my hair sheep.  They were purchased at Windy Acres Farm in Orlinda and will hopefully be supplying us with a some nice lambs in the late Spring/early Summer.  I’ll be honest, I’m not a huge fan of sheep.  Nothing really wrong with them but they are not friendly, stare at me funny, and are rather boring.  BUT, I do love lamb chops!  Since we enjoy producing the majority of our own meat, I figured I might as well do the lambs as well.  I mean, have you priced lamb in the grocery store?  Very expensive!  Cooper, my collie, loves the sheep…they run when he chases them!  Bad dog!

I’ve put all of the goats back in the pasture together and the bucks back in their pasture.  All of the girls should be bred and lots of babies arriving in the Spring.  I spent New Year’s Day trimming hooves.  Made it through half of the girls and will finish up with the rest on Saturday. Some of them don’t mind me trimming and the others fight like wild cats.  But they will all get on the stand if I give them a cookie.  The quickest way to a goat’s heart is with a cookie.  (Animal cookies! They love them!)  Here’s Baby Girl.  She is one of the bottle babies I raised almost 2 years ago.  She is such a sweetie.  She loves to be loved on.  And what a cutie!

I’m still working on my 2015 Class/Workshop Schedule and should have that posted shortly.  And, I am still considering whether or not I will be doing the Poultry CSA this year.  I appreciate all of you that purchase chicken and turkey from me and I am considering my options.  I’ll be honest, I hate raising the birds but we love to have them on the dinner table.  I just have to decide if I want to go best computer desk through the yucky parts to get to the good fried chicken dinners.

And, it is already count-down time for the Farmer’s Market!  In just a few months we’ll be opening!  My garlic is looking very good this year!  Can’t wait!

Have a great January!  Stay warm and be safe! also check Best Way To Wash a Down Comforter