Happy Winter from Hidden Springs Farms

Happy Winter from Hidden Springs Farms

Welcome to Hidden Springs Farms

Happy Winter!  Yes, winter finally arrived here at Hidden Springs Farms.  After having 70 degree weather at Christmas time, Mother Nature gave us a wintery wonderland this past weekend.  First came the ice, followed by snow and BOY-OH-BOY did we get snow.  I’d estimate around 8-9 inches and the snow drifts were even higher.  They say its the most snow we’ve gotten since 2003.  While I know it is a pain in the tush for those that have to drive to work, I love to see the snow.  It is so calming and relaxing to me.  Here are a couple pictures from around the farm.  You can see that the ice really was tough on the trees, but it looks beautiful.

 

Jumper and Winnie LOVED the snow.  It was funny on the first morning when I went over to the barn to let them out of their kennels.  Usually the first thing they do is go running out of the barn to chase the ducks or barn cats.  This time, the took off running until they got to the door and stopped very quickly.  Snow is a new thing to both of them, or at least this much snow.  It didn’t take them long to say “this stuff is COOL!”

The cows and sheep are doing well.  They are so well insulated that the snow stays on their backs like it does on the roof of the house and barns.  And, as long as they have hay and water, they don’t mind being in the weather.  We still have 4 girls that need to calf and quite honestly, I’m glad they have waited until after the snow.  I know it is possible for cows to deliver in terrible weather, but I feel better knowing that the little ones won’t get too chilled.  Besides, I’m really not ready to raise any bottle calves right now.

I have a very fun day the beginning of the month.  I spent the day doing a ride-along with my Vet, Dr. Woodall from Logan Bethel Veterinary Clinic in Russellville, KY.  Dr. Woodall has been my vet for years (and years).  Since I am not working a corporate job right now, I thought it would be both fun and educational to ride with him and see what the day in a life of large animal vet is like.  I met Dr. Woodall at 6:30 am at a large dairy near Adairville, Ky and then visited 7 dairy farms with him.  Basically doing pregnancy checks but also other things such as sick calves, a cow with a dislocated hip, and castrating bull calves.  What a great day for me!

Dancer, my Jersey, will be calving in May.  She is getting to the end of her current lactation, but after she delivers, I’ll be up to eyeballs in Milk.  Just curious if any of my readers would be interested in a Cow Share program this summer and fall.  For those that don’t know, a Cow share program makes it legal for folks that want to drink raw milk to do so legally in the State of Tennessee.  Raw milk (non-pasturized) is illegal to sell in Tennessee but through a Cow Share program, participates buy an interest in a dairy cow.  Then pay a monthly fee to the farmer to care for and milk the cow.  In exchange for this service, you get a gallon of raw milk per week.  We can also make arrangements to get butter and/or cheese.  I have worked out all of the details at this time but let me know if you are interested.  I want to be sure there is interest before moving forward.

Not a lot of other things happening on the farm.  We are fencing a back pasture when the weather cooperates and doing the normal farm chores every morning and night.  Bullford, our bull, will be put in with the ladies this month and I’m sure he’ll be VERY excited.  With that move, we’ll be moving a couple young heifers and a young bull out of the “romance” pasture and putting them in with the two young Jersey steers.

I hope that everyone stays warm.  It won’t be too much longer before Spring is heading your way.


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